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Wine

Wine is a fermented grape product, commonly ingested as a source of alcohol, that is seen as healthier due to its high stilbene and resveratrol content. There are a variety of other antioxidants in wine that can benefit health.

Our evidence-based analysis on wine features 9 unique references to scientific papers.

Research analysis led by Kamal Patel.
All content reviewed by the Examine.com Team. Published: Jul 2, 2013
Last Updated:

Summary of Wine

TL;DR - contains multiple supplements

Wine is a fermented and usually alcoholic beverage made from grapes. It tends to come in two forms, red or white, in which the different processing can yield different levels of colors found in the grape skin (which include resveratrol, anthocyanins, and other bioactives). Red wine tends to be seen as more beneficial due to higher levels of micronutrients.

Most benefit with red wine, epidemiologically, is seen with 300mL of red wine daily, plotted on a J-curve.[1] This is due to a combination of all factors in red wine.

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Things To Know & Note

Primary Function:

Also Known As

Red Wine, White Wine

Do Not Confuse With

Alcohol, Resveratrol

Frequently Asked Questions about Wine

Can drinking wine really replace exercise?

Scientific Research on Wine

Wine tends to contain the following, in varying dosages according to growing conditions and type of wine:

  • Resveratrol, a stilbene compound

  • Resveratrol oligomers (ε-viniferin, α-viniferin, sophostilbene A, rhaponticin, piceatannol).[2]

  • Alcohol

  • The amino acid proline[3] which acts with flavonol compounds to contribute bitter taste.[4]

  • Flavonol compounds like Quercetin, Kaempferol, Isorhamnetin, and Myricetin glycosides[5]

  • Anthocyanins (in red wines), up to 45 different combinations of glycosides[5]

  • Flavanals, including the four Green Tea Catechins and 4 other catechins.[5]

  • Cinnamic acids such as Fertaric acid, Ferulic acid and Chlorogenic acid[5]

  • Benzoic acids such as vanillic acid and protocatechuic acid (anthocyanin metabolite)[5]

  • Possible natamycin content, based on processing and usage to avoid Ochratoxin A contamination[6][7]

  • Melatonin from the grapes[8] as well as some serotonin[9] The metabolite of serotonin, 5-HIAA, and the precursor, tryptophan, also exist in grapes and wine.