Kava

Last Updated: September 28 2022

Kava is a herb that has traditionally been drunk as a hypnotic and anxiety reducer. It has been shown effective in reducing anxiety, sometimes at a potency similar to pharmaceuticals; may be a cognitive enhancer, but not completely safe.

Kava is most often used for

What else is Kava known as?
Note that Kava is also known as:
  • Piper methysticum
  • Kava Pepper
  • Ava Pepper
  • Kava Kava
  • Intoxicating Pepper
  • Awa
  • rauschpfeffer
  • sakau
  • tonga
  • wurzelstock
  • yangona
Dosage information

When supplementing Kava, initially an extract known as WS1490 should be sought out. 300mg of this extract daily (in three divided doses of 100mg) appears to be reliable and effective for the treatment of anxiety and other cognitive issues. Doses of up to 800mg of the WS1490 extract have been tolerated for short periods of time.

Otherwise, supplementation of any product conferring 250mg collective kavalactones (the active ingredients) is used.

Although it is usually taken at multiple times throughout the day with meals, if a single dose per day is being used it tends to be used prior to sleep.

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